Tetteh Nettey’s Journey from a Watchman to an Academic Force…

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Tetteh Nettey

Sometimes it’s difficult to see what God has in store for us when our world crumbles as we go through hardships. But what we should always remember is that when one door closes, another one opens.

This aptly summarises Tetteh Nettey’s journey through life.

Born to Maxwell Nerboi Nettey and Mary Opong Ansomaa from Nsawam in the Eastern Region. Young Nettey began his educational journey with his siblings at the St Anthony Preparatory School, Latebiokorshie before proceeding to Cambridge International School after which he stayed at home for sometime because the second cycle schools he chose did not admit him due to his poor grades.

Undeterred, Nettey applied and was admitted into a technical programme at the Accra Technical Training Centre (ATTC) for three years to study Auto Mechanic, during which he went on an internship at Construction Pioneers (CP) on three different occasions.

On two occasions, he worked as an auto mechanic intern, but was unfortunately relieved of his duties by one of his supervisors for an offence he termed “day dreaming on the job.”

This incident shook the young man off his feet, but eventually started him on the path to discovering his real potentials. Nettey reapplied to the same company and was accepted, but this time, to the security department, where he served for two-and-a-half years as a watchman.

There, Nettey cultivated a deep love for literature and devoted his night shifts and free time to serious private studies. He also reached out to friends who were in school for assistance. That way, he was able to write his General Certificates of Education (GCE) Ordinary in 10 months and immediately proceeded to do his Advanced Level courses, which was his passport into the University of London.

While at the University, Nettey encountered different degrees of academic challenges, which led to his failure in all his law courses. Again, the difficulty did not dim his focus, instead it ignited a fresh fire in him to reach out and help other young people who are faced with similar challenges. This desire prompted him to publish his first book which he titled, “You Failed, So What?”

Credit:newsghana.com.gh
Credit:newsghana.com.gh

Encouraged by his future, Nettey applied and got admitted to the newly established Central University College in Accra in 1998, where he obtained a Bachelor of Science in Human Resource Management. While at the university, he took a job as a watchman, opening the gate for his colleagues in other to raise funds to sponsor himself through school.

As expected, he had a hard time with his school mates who constantly scorned him, as they considered it unusual for a student to work as a watchman especially in the same school where he is enrolled to study.

Following completion of the course, Nettey was appointed acting Public Relations Officer of the university college and two years later, he was made the Admissions Officer of the Central University College.

He later enrolled at the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA) to study for a Master of Business Administration degree in Entrepreneurship.

As the Admissions Officer, I realised that I could help students enter the university because I saw the strengths and weaknesses in their applications and that was when the idea of setting up the Meridian Pre-University was nurtured, he said.

With all of these training opportunities, Nettey edged closer to his breakthrough without even realising it at the time. Soon, the puzzle pieces came together and he began to see the big picture.

In August, 2007, the change agent introduced the pre-university concept in Ghana, with the setting up of the Meridian Pre-University, with a firm desire to give opportunity to students who did not meet the requirements for the universities but had completed second cycle institutions. According to him, the school began with 20 students and surprisingly God always added four students to the number each day.

The Meridian Pre-University is an educational institution accredited by the West African Examinations Council and awards diplomas to students at the end of their programmes.

We started the Meridian Pre-University in 2007 but we did not have a university in mind. But in second/third year, we realised that there was the need to start our own university college. So we started the process of accreditation for Marshalls and by God’s grace in our fifth year, we had the green light from the National Accreditation Board. He recounts

He also went further to set up a remedial school called High Point Academy, creating an opportunity for those who did not pass their West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE) to enable them  pass their examination for university education.

Despite his high achievements in the academic world, Nettey continues to strive for more knowledge, always seeking to further improve himself and sharpen his skills.

Dr Nettey is married to Genevieve and they have three children – Grandsir, Lynnette and Giovanni Nettey.

 

© 2016 – 2017, Lovelyn Okafor. All rights reserved.

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